2 minutes with the young star of ‘Inclusion Makes the World more Vibrant'

What did you think of the script when you were first asked to audition?

I was excited about the script and I thought the story was beautiful and caring. I was especially excited about the monologue, as it was very descriptive with loads of adjectives. I wanted to see the painting for myself. When I did finally see the painting, I was surprised at how big it was; it was amazing. I probably didn’t appreciate art much myself until I saw how well the monologue described the painting. It made me feel the painting.



How long did it take you to remember that big monologue and how did you remember it all?

I rehearsed it a few times. It wasn’t too hard, it felt like I was telling a story. A very descriptive story! I really enjoyed the monologue, as you don’t often get to tell a story like that in one go. However, I did keep pronouncing ‘heroism’ wrong. I said ‘hero-ism’. I couldn’t get that one right.


What do you think the film is about?

I think the film is about making art available to everyone.


Do you think the film has an important message?

The bigger message of the film is about inclusion. Making something like art available to everyone and not just those that can see. The film made me think about putting myself into a situation where I was told that I couldn’t enjoy something that everyone else could, because I didn’t have the physical or mental ability to do it and that made me feel sad. So inclusion is about including everyone, regardless of ability. By doing that you also get to understand lots of different viewpoints and maybe something that you may not have considered previously.


What did you enjoy most about making the film?

I really enjoyed working in the Art Gallery, I have a greater appreciation for art now. The monologue was inspiring and excited me. Who thought an old painting could be so interesting!


We heard you told your friends at school that people with a disability worked on set with you, what did you think about that experience?

When I got to school the day after filming my friends asked me where I was the day before. I explained to them that I had been working on a short film about inclusion. I described to them the Art Gallery scene and how I had had a mother who was blind and that I was describing the painting too. I also explained how it was really cool that people with a disability were also included in the making of the film. That was the coolest and I think it made the message of inclusion more meaningful.